GGW "e" Vignettes • Vol. XVI, No. 4 • November 2009

If you do not see images with this newsletter, click above on Load Images.
Founded in 1979, the glass art studio of Gong Glass Works is directed by artist Nancy Gong. Gong Glass Works specializes in the design and fabrication of glass art work including leaded, etched, carved, chipped and painted glass. GGW is also the distributor for UltraGlas Inc. The primary focus is on site-specific installations, embracing fine art, decorative art, architectural ornamentation, signage and graphics. GGW designs for residential, commercial and institutional applications with emphasis on customer satisfaction; sensitive, responsive and enduring designs and quality craftsmanship.

In this issue • John Walsh Award – An Array of Many Children • City Roots Remembered with Canandaigua National Bank Commission• How Glass Art Work Enhances Sustainable Projects • In Translation • In the Works, State Park Comes to Rochester • Become a Fan at Nancy Gong, Gong Glass Works on Facebook! • Occasional Entertainment Back Behind the Studio

Watch for SMALL WORKS and GIFTS updates at www.nancygong.com in the next few days.

John Walsh Award – An Array of Many Children
Above: 3-1/2' Pyramid design casts multiple dynamic views of one carved image.
Above: 3-1/2" Pyramid design casts multiple dynamic views of one carved image.


This year's John Walsh Award features one single rendering of the National Center for Missing Children's logo of three children. The children are lightly carved on optical dichroic glass. The pyramid shaped glass casts multiple images of the Center's children in different color combinations from each and every view. It's a dynamic design for a dynamic organization.

To see more small works, visit: http://www.nancygong.com/SmallWorks.html and http://www.nancygong.com/ChineseBlessings.html

City Roots Remembered with Canandaigua National Bank Commission
Above: Sketch of 85' x 46' etched and painted glass design for Canandaigua National Bank's Alexander Park Branch highlights the bank's brand image while celebrating the arts in the neighborhood and their roots in the Finger Lakes.
Above: Sketch of 85" x 46" etched and painted glass design for Canandaigua National Bank's Alexander Park Branch highlights the bank's brand image while celebrating the arts in the neighborhood and their roots in the Finger Lakes.

The Strong Museum now sits on the land where my first house was as a young child on Manhattan Street. The building our family restaurant was in survived urban renewal which took lower Monroe Avenue where my parents' Chinese Laundry was. For the longest time my parents hoped the hospital would buy the property their restaurant, Lychee Gardens sat on. Instead the hospital built parking lots all around them. I worked at the restaurant located at the time, in what was a thriving section of Rochester. I walked from the nearby Park Avenue neighborhood to work. There was a busy little hospital surrounded by doctors' offices, Monroe High School—my dad and older siblings' alma mater, Sears—where I went for candy and nuts, White Tower—where I went for french fries when business was slow and a gas station where we parked, all on the edge of downtown. My parents sold the building and opened a new restaurant in the suburbs. The building became the home of an East Indian restaurant. When the hospital closed, the area became a ghost town.

Today, redevelopment of the old Genesee Hospital campus is well underway. It will bring new life back to this part of the City.

City roots. So many memories, but it was time for a change. The building our restaurant was in at the corner of Monroe and Alexander has been demolished. It is now the parking lot for Canandaigua National Bank's new Alexander Park branch. The new building designed by Mossien Associates is a welcome addition to the neighborhood. What a surprise that decades later, I would have a connection to the corner of Monroe and Alexander once again. This new "arts branch" will be embellished with a large etched and painted glass transom on the Alexander Street side—the main entrance. The colorful design echoes CNB's roots in Canandaigua with references to visual and performing arts in the neighborhood. Watch for the bank's opening and the art! Coming real soon!

How Glass Art Work Enhances Sustainable Projects
Above: 'In Art, Science and Life, What is the Question' viewed from the RIT Administrative Services Lobby. The etched glass provides views to the outside while drawing daylight into the interior. Photo by Don Cochran.
Above: "In Art, Science and Life, What is the Question" viewed from the RIT Administrative Services Lobby. The etched glass provides views to the outside while drawing daylight into the interior. Photo by Don Cochran.

Panes of Glass graze the new public spaces at the University Services Center at RIT. The goal was to introduce daylight to interior workspaces and circulation to help reduce the need for interior lighting as well as giving the users as many views to the exterior as possible. In the main lobby an artfully edged wall of glass by Nancy Gong introduced a complex level of views, education and imagination taking cues from many areas of study available at RIT. The glass art work enhances our architectural design as well as our endeavor to achieve the highest LEED certification.

Using glass for wall surfaces helped our project in these following categories;
• Indoor Environmental Quality – Daylight & Views Credit 8.1 and 8.2
• Materials & Resources – Recycled Content Credit4.1 and 4.2
• Materials & Resources – Regional Materials Credit 5.1 and 5.2
• Innovation & Design Process – Could be used as the LEED education wall

I believe that including glass art work is a great choice to both be sustainable and increase the visual interest of a space.
By Dirk Schneider, AIA, Partner
Chaintreuil | Jensen | Stark Architects

Editor's note: Dirk, it was a great honor to work with you and the Design / Build Team: Rochester Institute of Technology, Chaintreuil | Jensen | Stark Architects, Bergmann Associates, Welliver & McGuire Inc. and Rochester Glass Inc. Thank you for having the vison!

In Translation
Above: Scaled drawing, an interpretation of 'Life on Kiawah,' SC in leaded glass.
Above: Scaled drawing, an interpretation of "Life on Kiawah," SC in leaded glass.

–––––

For all our growing communications forums and networks, we rarely question publicly why we're here—why we exist.

Regardless of whether this pivotal question is voiced out loud, it lies underneath different world views that drive different human endeavors.

If our existence is limited to our temporary stay in a corporeal form, then our practical, literal understanding of ourselves and our world makes sense—as does a drive to create immediate physical, tangible beauty and comfort—to create materialism and wealth.

If our existence has a broader purpose and meaning, in a context beyond our individual lifetimes, then our metaphorical exploration and understanding of ourselves and our world make sense, as does our drive to create and recreate the wisdom, the beauty, of the world—to create something lasting and eternal—to create art.

In degrees that vary from age to age, from person to person, from moment to moment, these world views co-exist in all of us, one surfacing and dominating for a time and then the other.

The arts represent our most important language—our most sophisticated symbolic mode of communication and expression—and our greatest and broadest efforts at understanding ourselves outside of a literal and mortal construct; the arts represent the search for, and the aesthetic expression of, universal metaphoric truth. Moreover, the arts provide us with a link between the individual and the universal, the literal and the metaphoric, the immediate and the eternal.

In Crisis, when we need balance, we turn to the arts for translation of our individual mortal experiences into lasting universal meaning—it is, in fact, especially these moments, what we need in order to survive.

By Sarah E. Lentini, Editor and Publisher of Metropolitan Magazine, President & CEO Arts & Cultural Council for Greater Rochester, Inc. Reprinted from the Summer 2009 issue with permission. Copyright 2009 Arts & Cultural Council for Greater Rochester. All rights reserved. http://www.artsrochester.org



In the Works, State Park Comes to Rochester
Above: A scaled line drawing of 'A Special Place,' the etched glass design for 2 out of 5 panels.
Above: A scaled line drawing of "A Special Place," the etched glass design for 2 out of 5 panels.

Also in the works is a richly detailed rendering of a near by state park in etched and painted glass.

"Our Special Place" is a nearly 18' wide x 5' h wall in an urban residence. The art glass will double as a privacy screen that will bring daylight and nature into the living space.

Watch for more details as this project progresses.


Become a Fan at Nancy Gong, Gong Glass Works on Facebook!

Check it out! Become a fan, follow the artist and the studio work. Let us know what you think.

Facebook, Nancy Gong, Gong Glass Works

Happy Thanksgiving to you and your families. We do have much to be thankful for! Enjoy your Holiday time.

Artfully yours,

Nancy


_
GGW "e" Vignettes is published by Nancy Gong, Gong Glass Works. All glass designs, contents and photos ©2009 Nancy Gong unless otherwise noted. To be sure to receive Gong Glass Works' "e newsletter" add gong@gong.pmailus.com to your address book. Do NOT send e-mails direct to the pmail plus address, it is a server address. To contact Nancy at Gong Glass Works, e-mail to Nancy@nancygong.com or call 585-288-5520. I'd love to hear from you. To see more newsletters, or to join the mailing list, click here. Your email address will not be sold or distributed in any way. With GGW "e" Vignettes vs. the studio post mail program, you'll get to see and hear more about exciting studio projects 4-6 times a year. To see more of Nancy's work, visit: http://www.NancyGong.com. Please pass this on!

 

Above: Occasional entertainment – on a sunny autumn day, colorful prayer flags and wild turkeys liven up the view out back behind the studio.
 
This e-mail was sent from Gong Glass Works
Immediate removal with PatronMail®
SecureUnsubscribe
.
 
To forward this e-mail to a friend or colleague, use this link.
To change your e-mail address or update preferences, use this link.